August 2016 | 4th Issue

In This Issue

Abstract Submission Closed

Scientific Program Highlights

Prof. Yasuo Tano Travel Grant

Hotel Reservation

Thailand Travel Tips

Abstract Submission Closed

Abstract submission for the 10th Asia-Pacific Vitreo-retina Society (APVRS) Congress in Bangkok, Thailand is now closed. The APVRS Congress organizers would like to thank all the authors who submitted their free papers, posters, e-posters and videos for review.

Selected reviewers will begin evaluating the submitted abstracts shortly. Authors will be notified of the abstract selection results no later than September 10, 2016.

 
 
Scientific Program Highlights

Chaired by Prof. Tien Yin Wong and Prof. Dennis Lam, the symposium "Retinal Papers in the Current Ophthalmic Literature" will focus on the growing volume of high-quality research within the retina subspecialty today.

The 10th APVRS Congress is very fortunate to have the editors-in-chief of important journals in ophthalmology - JAMA Ophthalmology and RETINA - join this symposium and share their views about the changing world of ophthalmic literature and publications on retinal diseases.

Prof. Neil Bressler and Prof. Alexander Brucker will discuss issues such as opportunities for case series and independent research among the growing number of major controlled trials and much more.

 
 
Prof. Yasuo Tano Travel Grant

The application deadline for the APVRS Prof. Yasuo Tano Travel Grant has now passed. This year, APVRS will offer up to 5 Prof. Yasuo Tano Travel Grants to young vitreo-retinal specialists attending the 10th Congress in Bangkok. Priority will be given to applicants who are younger than age 40, from a developing country and whose presentations have been accepted (as a free paper or poster) as part of the Congress scientific program.

Recipients who live outside of the Congress host country (Thailand) will each be awarded US $500, whereas those from Thailand will be granted US $250. Selection results will be announced by the end of September 2016.

 
 
Hotel Reservation

Hotel reservation for the 10th APVRS Congress in Bangkok is now open to all paid delegates through November 9, 2016. Located adjacent to the Bangkok Convention Center, the Centara Grand Bangkok at CentralWorld is the official hotel of the 2016 APVRS Congress.

Congress organizers have also secured competitive rates for delegates at a number of different hotels to suit a range of budgets and preferences, including the Amari Watergate, Centara Watergate Pavillion Hotel Bangkok and First Hotel. Please note that shuttle service to the Congress venue from these alternative hotel options will not be provided.

For more information, please visit http://2016.apvrs.org/hotel-reservation/. Only delegates who have registered and paid for the 10th APVRS Congress can make hotel reservations after logging in to the online Congress system.

 
 
Thailand Travel Tips

Weather

The APVRS Congress in Bangkok will be held from December 8 - 10, which is during the country's dry season. The average high temperature for the month is 31℃, with an average low of 20℃. Average rainfall for the month of December is just 5 mm.

In general, the weather in Thailand is hot and humid throughout the year. Travelers are encouraged to bring lightweight clothing and appropriate sun protection, such as sunscreen and broad-brimmed hats, for outdoor activities.

Etiquette

The people of Thailand are known for their politeness and hospitality toward tourists. In turn, visitors should be courteous and respectful of their local hosts and customs.

Particularly when visiting temples or other sacred sites in Thailand, travelers should dress modestly. Those wearing shorts or sleeveless shirts may not be allowed to enter, so it is best to ensure that clothing at least covers one's shoulders and knees. Additionally, it is advisable to wear shoes that are easy to put on, as they must be removed to enter temples and private residences.

In Thailand, the royal family are highly revered. In fact, it is illegal to show disrespect to the king or other royalty. The king is featured on the country's currency, so take care not to tear or step on any Thai baht.

Although patting a child on the head is seen as cute in the West, it is very rude to touch a person's head in Thailand. The head is considered the holiest part of the body, whereas the feet are the dirtiest. Travelers should try not to point their feet directly at another person or Buddhist statue.

 
 
 
 
APVRS Secretariat
Tel: (852) 3943-5889
Fax: (852) 2715-9490